Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals vaccinate almost 1,000 colleagues against the flu in just 48 hours

In just two days, more than 800 nurses, doctors and other health professionals have volunteered to get their flu jab at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals (DBTH).

Friday, 24th September 2021, 2:02 pm

The Trust is on a mission to vaccinate all colleagues directly involved in patient care and treatment.

DBTH has been amongst the first acute NHS providers to vaccinate 75 per cent of front-line staff against the illness for the past number of years.

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Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals vaccinate over 800 staff against influenza as winter gets closer.

Since beginning on Monday, September 20, the organisation’s team of vaccinators have worked tirelessly to give medics and clinicians easy access to the vaccine.

The health provider is placing significant emphasis on this year’s campaign as there is a potential for influenza, norovirus and COVID-19 to be circulating as the weather turns colder.

David Purdue, Deputy Chief Executive and Chief Nurse, said: “Ensuring colleagues protect themselves against flu is extremely important, however, given the challenges of the past 18 months, it is absolutely crucial.

“Team DBTH have been working hard in their fight against COVID-19, and as winter arrives we will begin to see cases of both flu and norovirus, in addition to the challenges presented by the pandemic.

People aged 65 and over, pregnant women, anyone with diabetes, or other at-risk groups are advised to ask their GP about having the flu vaccine.

“Getting the jab ensures our staff are protecting themselves, their colleagues, and their friends, family and loved ones.”

Throughout the rest of September and into October, the Trust will continue to vaccinate its workforce to further reduce the risk of hospital patients contracting flu this winter, with an additional COVID-19 booster programme also planned.

Flu can cause a range of illnesses from mild to severe, even among healthy people.

People aged 65 and over, pregnant women, anyone with diabetes, chest or heart conditions and others in at-risk groups are advised to ask their GP about having the flu vaccine.

Mr Perdue continues: “This has been a difficult year in many ways, but our communities have been outstanding in their support.

“Please continue a little while longer – wash your hands regularly, wear an appropriate face covering when necessary, and leave a two metre distance between yourself and others when out and about when you can.

“Adherence to these three things will make all the difference this winter.”