Worksop mum-of-three urges women to attend cervical screening tests after shock cancer diagnosis

Victoria Cristofis, is trying to raise cervical cancer awareness in Worksop after doctors recently discovered she has abnormal cells in her cervix that could develop into life-threatening cancer. Picture: Marie Caley NWGU 10-09-14 Cristofis MC 3
Victoria Cristofis, is trying to raise cervical cancer awareness in Worksop after doctors recently discovered she has abnormal cells in her cervix that could develop into life-threatening cancer. Picture: Marie Caley NWGU 10-09-14 Cristofis MC 3
  • Mum-of-three Victoria put off cervical screening test for a year and thought she would ‘never see her kids grow up’ after diagnosis
  • 28-year-old now cancer-free and embracing new healthy lifestyle after hysterectomy
  • Has inspired others with campaign for change, saying: ‘I don’t want pity. I want women to know this test saves lives.’

A 28-year-old Worksop woman is urging women in the area to attend cervical screening tests after speaking of her horror at being diagnosed with life-threatening cancer.

Brave Victoria Cristofis had put off having a cervical screening test for over a year and was ‘devastated’ when doctors found abnormal cells on her cervix which were revealed to be cancerous.

The mum-of-three, of Primrose Way, has since gone on to have a full hysterectomy and is now cancer-free, but also keener than ever to highlight the importance of cervical screening tests.

Victoria, who has been praised for her positivity, told the Guardian: “Nothing can prepare you for a cancer diagnosis.

“All I could think about was the fact I might not see my children grow up. It has been a difficult journey, but I got through it.

“I am determined to stay positive as well as fit and healthy after what happened. I don’t want pity from anyone, or to be the face of cervical cancer.

“All I want is for women to know that attending cervical screening tests can save your life and, if the worst case scenario happens and you are diagnosed with cancer, it’s not the end. You can beat it- as I did.”

A cervical screening test is a method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix.

Although most women’s test results show that everything is normal, for around 1 in 20 women the test will show some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix.

Most of these changes won’t lead to cervical cancer and the cells may go back to normal on their own. But in some the abnormal cells need to be removed so they can’t become cancerous.

All women over 25 who are registered with a GP are invited for cervical screening. You can find more information at http://www.cancerscreening.nhs.uk/