Nottingham Castle hits visitor target of 200,000 - but ticket prices still set to increase

Nottingham Castle has reached its target of 200,000 visitors in its first year under the control of City Council – but ticket prices will increase.
Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now

The Labour-run council brought the historic site back under its control last year and reopened the gates in June, following the collapse of Nottingham Castle Trust in November 2022.

A ‘more realistic’ annual visitor target of 200,000 was set by the council, one-third lower than the trust’s original hopes of 300,000.

During a corporate scrutiny committee meeting on March 13, Coun David Mellen (Lab), council leader said the target had been reached.

Nottingham Castle has hit its visitor numbers target - but ticket prices will still go up. Photo: SubmittedNottingham Castle has hit its visitor numbers target - but ticket prices will still go up. Photo: Submitted
Nottingham Castle has hit its visitor numbers target - but ticket prices will still go up. Photo: Submitted

He also confirmed ticket prices would be increasing, although the exact pricing structure is yet to be confirmed.

Tickets are currently £12 each for an annual pass, while under-15s are free.

Coun Mellen said: “We have reached the 200,000 visitors that was required to make a reasonable business case for the castle.

“That is three months early because it was to be done by the end of June.”

The reopening and stabilisation of the castle was one priority in the authority’s strategic council plan.

A refresh of the plan was approved by full council on March 4,.

But while seven pledges in the plan have been achieved, including the reopening of the castle and keeping open some free public toilets, 99 remain ‘in progress’ and 12 – nclude investing in Nottingham’s thriving artistic and cultural life, seeking funding for heritage restoration projects in the city centre, protecting the benefits and welfare advice service, launching an anti-poverty strategy and bidding for UK City of Culture 2030 – have been ‘parked’.

Coun Mellen said: “Currently, they are not affordable.”