Creswell Crags under threat of permanent closure amid coronavirus crisis

A fundraising drive has been launched to help save a much-loved Derbyshire attraction which could close for good amid the coronavirus crisis.

By Michael Broomhead
Tuesday, 24th March 2020, 5:00 pm
Updated Tuesday, 24th March 2020, 5:20 pm

Creswell Crags, which has a history dating back at least 60,000 years, is currently closed to members of the public because of the Covid-19 pandemic – meaning it is losing out on the vital revenue it needs in order to to survive.

Creswell Heritage Trust, which runs the attraction, said it was already facing a challenging 2020 as it was the first year it was ‘not scheduled to receive any regular external funding from local authorities’.

Witch marks were discovered at Creswell Crags last year.

Staff have now set up this JustGiving page to help save Creswell Crags.

Dr Tim Caulton, chair of Creswell Heritage Trust, said “Creswell Crags has been home to humans for millennia.

“Creswell Heritage Trust cares for the site which is one of the most significant and protected heritage sites in the UK.

“Our immediate future has never been more perilous.

“We are unable to claim at present on our business insurance as we close in response to coronavirus in what was already set to be a challenging year.

“Without significant external support, the organisation that looks after Creswell Crags will not be able to survive the summer.”

Paul Baker, executive director, added: “For a number of years our amazing team has worked to ensure this internationally important site stays open.

“We have faced the challenge of the reduction and eventual end of regular funding, we have withstood extreme weather conditions, we have made huge steps to become entirely self-sufficient.

“2020 was to be the first year we would have achieved this – and nothing prepared us for this threat.

“Without public support the future of this internationally important site, and our schools and public engagement programme, is in jeopardy.

“If Creswell Crags means as much to you as it does to us, please help if you are able.”

With its stunning views, cave tours, welcoming café and museum of archaeological artefacts, Creswell Crags – which is situated on the Derbyshire/Nottinghamshire border – is considered to be a key part of the East Midlands’ tourism economy.