Nottinghamshire Police benefiting from national ‘county lines’ operation

Nottinghamshire has benefited from a National Crime Agency report into county lines that aims to tackle drug supply, vulnerability and harm across the country.

The report highlights how violence and control used by drug dealing networks is continuing, and the exploitation of children and vulnerable adults is increasing.

Nottinghamshire Police officer facing gross misconduct hearing.

Nottinghamshire Police officer facing gross misconduct hearing.

The impact of county lines covers all police force areas and organised crime threats, so law enforcement, government, charities and other organisations need to continue to work together to disrupt criminal activity.

Since its launch in September 2018, four warrants were executed in Nottinghamshire resulting in four arrests.

Quantities of class A drugs and cash were seized along with a machete and a flick knife.

Safeguarding was also provided to a young child and further support provided to a vulnerable adult.

Inspector Heather Sutton of Nottinghamshire Police said: “We know that county lines exists and that recruiters prey on the most vulnerable in our society so we welcomed the NCA’s support in targeting the area and we are pleased that it’s brought about some positive results.

“We won’t tolerate drug related activity or this treatment of young and vulnerable people.

“We will continue to crackdown on potential activity across Nottinghamshire and ask anyone with any information to call us on 101, even if they have a slightest suspicion that someone vulnerable is being targeted, we can put measures in place to help and protect them.”

Nikki Holland, director of investigations at the NCA and County Lines lead, added: “Tackling county lines is a national law enforcement priority. We know that criminal networks use high levels of violence, exploitation and abuse to ensure compliance from the vulnerable people they employ to do the day-to-day drug supply activity.

“Every organised crime group trafficking drugs is a business which relies on cash flow.

“County lines is no different. What we will continue to do with our law enforcement partners is disrupt their activity and take away their assets.

“We also need to ensure that those exploited are safeguarded and understand the consequences of their involvement.

“This is not something law enforcement can tackle alone - the need to work together to disrupt this activity and safeguard vulnerable victims must be the priority for everyone.”

The assessment publication follows a week of coordinated law enforcement activity across the UK which resulted in more than 600 arrests.