Langold: St Luke’s church reopens its doors after £50,000 transformation

John Mann and members of the Langold community held a special day to re-open St Luke's Church. John Mann is pictured with Carol Bower, Joan Linacre, Pam Lake, Linda Whiting and Maurice Stocks.
John Mann and members of the Langold community held a special day to re-open St Luke's Church. John Mann is pictured with Carol Bower, Joan Linacre, Pam Lake, Linda Whiting and Maurice Stocks.

Celebrations are underway at St Lukes Church in Langold which has reopened after a £50k transformation thanks to fundraising efforts of the local community.

Bassetlaw MP John Mann officially reopened the church in a ceremony on Saturday 18th April.

The project, which started in October 2014, has upgraded the well-used and much- loved building to contemporary standards. A new heating and lighting system has been installed, its toilets have been rearranged and greatly improved, and a brand new catering kitchen has been installed.

Fundraising committee secretary Maurice Stokes, who has overseen the project, said: “We are so pleased that our transformed hall is re-opening.”

“In the last five years the hall’s condition meant that use declined. The groups that still met there found it hard to do so because of its condition. Therefore we implemented this project.”

“We are so pleased that it is now complete and our doors are now wide-open to groups and people looking for a welcoming, warm and flexible space.”

Funding for the work came from several sources, including WREN and The Veolia Environmental Trust, who awarded £15,000 and £11,595. Support has also come from Nottinghamshire Historic Churches Trust, The Coalfields Regeneration Trust , the All Churches Trust, and the Alexander & Caroline Simons Trust. The church and the congregation raised £2,250 through fundraising activities and collection.

The church was used in the past by many local community groups, including guides, brownies, an aerobics club and a mums and toddlers group. However, its deteriorating condition meant it was not able to meet modern standards.

The hall was built in 1927 as part of the Langold Village project to create housing and a community for incoming miners. The building was inaugurated with a stone-laying ceremony performed by Miss Mellish on 25 June 1928.