Children’s hospice hits the jackpot at Vegas Night

Guests trying their luck at the blackjack table at the Vegas Night.
Guests trying their luck at the blackjack table at the Vegas Night.

When Vegas came to Worksop, the popular charity, Bluebell Wood Children’s Hospice, hit the jackpot.

For about £500 was raised for the North Anston-based hospice from a fun-packed evening of gambling games.

John Bower, of the Worksop Support Group for Bluebell Wood, hosts a version of 'Play Your Cards Right'.

John Bower, of the Worksop Support Group for Bluebell Wood, hosts a version of 'Play Your Cards Right'.

More than 50 supporters went along to Worksop Golf Club to chance their luck at roulette and blackjack tables, and a specially devised version of the former TV show, ‘Play Your Cards Right’, hosted by a colourful John Bower.

Guests could also take part in a donkey derby, a golf putting game and ‘rolling the potato at the bottle’. More entertainment came from singer Gary Coulthard, a fundraising raffle and two quizzes, all washed down by a pie and peas supper.

Jim Delaney, chairman of the Worksop Support Group for Bluebell Wood, said: “It was a fantastic night. I’d like to thank our hosts, Carol and David, who organised the evening, and also the staff at the golf club who looked after us brilliantly.

“Thanks also to everyone who volunteered for and supported the event. We are delighted to have raised more funds for the hospice, which is a cause close to many of our hearts.”

THE success of the Vegas Night delighted Melanie Rose, a community fundraiser in Worksop for the hospice. She said: “Every penny raised helps make a difference to families across our region, giving them the opportunity to make special memories together.

“We are really grateful to the Worksop Support Group for coming up trumps and arranging another fantastic event in support of Bluebell Wood.”

The hospice is currently caring for about 290 children and young adults who are seriously ill or terminally ill, and offering support to their families. It costs more than £4 million each year to keep it open.