Quarry firm plans to restore Misson site to wetland wildlife habitat

John Ingham, Hanson's principal landscape architect - the mineral extraction company has renewed its corporate membership of Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust as it looks towards the start of restoration work at  the Newington Quarries complex in Misson.
John Ingham, Hanson's principal landscape architect - the mineral extraction company has renewed its corporate membership of Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust as it looks towards the start of restoration work at the Newington Quarries complex in Misson.

A mineral extraction company is making plans to restore a Misson quarry complex as a wildlife habitat when mining operations end next year.

Hanson UK, a construction materials supplier, has plans to create a nature-spotters’ haven at the Newington Quarries, on Newington Road, with help from the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust.

The redshank is one of the highest priority red list of Birds of Conservation Concern which Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust hope will be attracted to the Newington Quarries complex in future.

The redshank is one of the highest priority red list of Birds of Conservation Concern which Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust hope will be attracted to the Newington Quarries complex in future.

John Ingham, Hanson landscape architect, said: “The trust has provided invaluable input and advice during the development of restoration proposals.

“With the help of NWT, Hanson is delivering significant biodiversity enhancements in this formerly intensive arable landscape.”

The plan includes easy access viewing areas for wetland wildlife, offering a chance to see exciting species without disturbing them.

It is hoped the site, which was a floodplain habitat until the 1980s, will attract wildlife including at-risk species such as curlew, redshank, snipe, bittern and bearded tit, as well as otters and water voles.

Janice Bradley, for NWT, said: “The complex is already set to be a key wildlife site for the future and we look forward to continuing discussions about the restoration of wet grasslands and reedbeds.”