Have your say on Dinnington St John's neighbourhood plan

Dinnington residents are being urged to have their say on a neighbourhood plan, which will shape the future of the town.

Tuesday, 20th April 2021, 4:53 pm

The planning referendum vote on May 6 will give residents a chance to decide if the Dinnington St John’s neighbourhood plan should be adopted by RMBC Council as part of the local plan.

The plan will earmark land for particular uses, for example housing, shops or employment land, and will be used by the borough council to decide future planning applications.

Ideas in the plan include the potential widening of the footpath on Laughton Road, more parking spaces and an extension of the one way road to New Street, opening up Constable Lane, as well as new shopfronts and awnings.

"Dinnington needs and deserves a good plan for its future development."

The referendum will ask voters within the neighbourhood plan area - Dinnington St John’s Parish - whether RMBC should use the neighbourhood plan to help it decide planning applications.

If more than half of voters are in favour of the plan, the council will implement it.

The plan, published in January 2021, was drawn up by Dinnington St John's Town Council and residents, as a way to tell RMBC what the community needs.

A report by Councillor David Smith, chairman of Dinnington St John’s town council and the Dinnington St John’s neighbourhood plan steering group states that the aim of the plan is to improve the area, which has "decreasing life expectancy, a worsening health situation, and limited employment possibilities".

The plan states: "A neighbourhood plan enables local communities like ours to have more control over development in their own area by preparing a framework against which planning proposals can be judged.

"The Parish is likely to face significant development over the coming years if the plans identified by RMBC are delivered.

"Dinnington needs and deserves a good plan for its future development.

"It will be used to promote investment in the town, guide new development to the most suitable sites, conserve valuable cultural and heritage assets, maintain and enhance its character and sense of place, secure improvements of all kinds, give a continuing voice to the community, and promote a better quality of life for current and future generations. "

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