North Derbyshire village pub could be converted into flats

A former north Derbyshire village pub could be converted into flats under new plans being considered by council chiefs.

Saturday, 27th February 2021, 12:30 pm

Developers want to turn the Boot and Shoe pub, on High Street, Whitwell, into four flats and they say the loss of the facility will ‘have little impact on the vitality and viability’ of the village.

A planning application has been submitted to Bolsover District Council to convert the ground floor of the building into two flats, with a further two apartments being located on the first floor.

The Boot and Shoe pub, on High Street, Whitwell, could be converted into flats under new plans.
The Boot and Shoe pub, on High Street, Whitwell, could be converted into flats under new plans.

The pub, which is considered to be an ‘unlisted building of merit’, already has one apartment on the first floor and the business closed to customers in March 2020.

Planning documents prepared by JVN Architecture, agents for the developer, say: “The building is thought to date from the early 18th Century but it has been altered significantly

since that time.

"It is a two-storey building built with a low painted brick wall on the front elevation with the remainder of the walls being white painted render, with a red plain tile roof.

"There is a turret feature on the south eastern corner of the building.

"To the rear of the building is a small beer garden and a car park.”

Although developers admit the pub is a ‘prominent’ building in the village, they say there will be little change to its external appearance.

"Overall the proposed alterations do not have a significant impact on the appearance of the building and retain its character,” reports on the Bolsover District Council website claim.

Documents also say Whitwell is well served with other pubs and facilities.

“The site is in a local centre but it is not in retail use and there are other public houses in the village such as the Holmefield Arms on Station Road and the Royal Oak on Bakestone

Moor,” the agent’s report says.

"There is also a community centre on Portland Street, a social club and other food outlets such as takeaways in the village.

“The loss of the public house will have little impact on the vitality and viability of the centre.”

In these confusing and worrying times, local journalism is more vital than ever. Thanks to everyone who helps us ask the questions that matter by taking out a subscription or buying a paper. We stand together. Nancy Fielder, editor.