Thousands flock to BBC Antiques Roadshow filming at Bolsover Castle

BBC Antiques Roadshow at Bolsover Castle

BBC Antiques Roadshow at Bolsover Castle

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Around 3,000 people from across the country descended on Bolsover Castle with their prized trinkets and curios for the eagerly-anticipated filming of hit BBC show, the Antiques Roadshow.

The 38th series of the BBC1 programme presented by Fiona Bruce saw it stop off in Bolsover for the first time in a blaze of summer sunshine.

And Ms Bruce said that she was delighted to be in town and impressed with the turnout for filming of the Sunday evening favourite.

She said: “What is great about this is that we could see anything. There’ll be anywhere between two and four thousand people here, and ideally we want to see something of great value, but also some great stories, and of course some great owners.

“We always love things which tell the story of the local area.”

One such story came from 75-year-old Hilary Wignell, from Clowne, just three miles away from the castle.

BBC Antiques Roadshow at Bolsover Castle, presenter Fiona Bruce

BBC Antiques Roadshow at Bolsover Castle, presenter Fiona Bruce

She had brought a 161-year-old walking stick, which had a psalm carved onto it by her great-great-grandfather, after he had suffered injury in a colliery accident on November 8 1864.

“My great-great-grandfather was William Scott, who carved the prayer in memory of Thomas Ward, who was his father,” said Hilary. “It has been handed down through the family, and my mother passed it on to me.

“I don’t know if it is a psalm which he wrote, or one that is in the Bible. It’s just so special, it’s an affirmation of his faith.”

Hilary said she would not be selling the walking stick, no matter how much it was worth.

There’ll be anywhere between two and four thousand people here, and ideally we want to see something of great value, but also some great stories, and of course some great owners

Presenter Fiona Bruce

She said that she did not know if the stick was a unique piece, but stressed that it was unique to her.

The BBC experts said they were looking forward to seeing what the Derbyshire public had to offer them, and that the pieces they look forward most to seeing are pieces they have no expectation of seeing.

Ian Pickford, the programme’s resident silver expert, said: “You never know what you’re going to get. I think when I was in Sheffield, I was expecting to see a lot of silver plate, but there were only one or two pieces like that.

“It’s like opening presents for Christmas, it has that level of excitement for me.”

Among the successful visitors were Fraser Ludlam, 46, and his 11-year-old son Arthur, from Barlow, who brought a chair which was found to be made of ebony from Sri Lanka, and was valued at up to £3,500.

And Amanda Bowler, of Bolsover, whose Louis Wain cat figurine - a piece she admitted was ‘love it or hate it’ - was found to be extremely collectable and was valued at up to £1,000.

Neither said they would be selling their valuable treasures.

Fraser, who admitted not having looked up the history of his chair despite it sitting in his bedroom for a decade, said he was proud of it, as it was described as having ‘endless quality’ by an expert.

“It was passed down from my grandmother,” he said. “I never knew anything about it, but it is fascinating and eye-catching, so I was glad to have the opportunity to bring it.

“I thought it might be worth £500ish, so I’m surprised. But it is going back home.”