Retro: Worksop was part of the big railway boom

WH Smith's bookstall on Worksop Station
WH Smith's bookstall on Worksop Station

Worksop station may not be a major junction on the British network these days but it was part of the railway boom of the 1840s and 1850s.

Worksop station was opened by the Sheffield and Lincolnshire Junction Railway, part of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway.

The decision to build the station at Worksop came after the Worksop Railway Act was passed in the House of Lords on 7th July 1846 and the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway Company hired architects Weightman and Hadfield, who in turn hired local man James Drabble, of Carlton-in-Lindrick, to build the station at a cost of £7,850 (£5.59 million in today’s money)

The station opened on 7th July 1849 and in 1875 the Midland Railway Company opened a branch line to Nottingham and Mansfield.

The Station Hotel was also built around that time.

Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway Company changed its name to the Great Central Railway in 1897 and built the longer platforms, waiting areas and refreshments rooms in 1900.

Today, Worksop is a stop on Northern Rail’s service from Lincoln Central to Sheffield and the northern terminus of East Midlands Trains’ Robin Hood Line from Nottingham and Mansfield.

The Mansfield section of the line was closed in 1964 as part of the Beeching cuts, but re-opened on 25th May 1998.

Our picture shows the WH Smith’s stand at the station.

The exact date is unknown but believed to be pre-1914.

Smith’s were one of the main companies to take advantage of the railway boom in by opening stands on station platforms, starting with London’s Euston in 1848.