Worksop: The face of a sex fiend - full story from court

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A teenage ‘sexual predator’ has been ordered to be detained indefinitely after carrying out a serious sex assault on a lone jogger at night in Worksop.

The 17-year-old, who can now be named as Jonjo Elswaino, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to a serious sexual assault charge and causing grievous bodily harm with intent.

On Wednesday 23rd October, Nottingham Crown Court heard how a woman at a house where Elswaino was staying described him as a ‘sexual predator’.

There was stunned silence in the courtroom as it was also said that Elswaino would have killed his victim if he had not been disturbed.

The 52-year-old female, who cannot be named, suffered a broken jaw, which meant she had to have metal plates fitted, a fracture to her right eye socket, a broken nose and excessive bruising to her neck where Elswaino had strangled her and she also lost some teeth.

After the attack, which occurred at around 8.30pm in Eddison Park Avenue on 1st April 2014, she flagged down a passing car and said: “I’m alive, I’m alive, thank god I’m alive.”

Elswaino, whose mother was in court, sat in the dock with his head bowed for most of the proceedings, wearing a white shirt and black trousers.

Prosecuting, Dawn Pritchard, said: “The victim was out jogging that evening, she said that she did feel very well and went out to get some fresh air.”

“She was wearing her jogging clothes, including jogging bottoms and trainers and she was out just doing her usual circuits.”

“She heard fast footsteps behind her but didn’t look behind her because she just thought it was another jogger.”

“Two hands came from behind and locked around her and she said she knew something was wrong.”

“She tried to scream for help but he punched her and dragged her down a grass verge into some trees by her ankles.”

“She tried to look who it was. He kept punching and kicking her. He started to strangle her and she drifted in and out of consciousness.”

“When she came back around, she thought it was a nightmare and he said ‘if you start shouting I will kill you’ and continued to beat her up.”

“When she regained consciousness again, she said she thought her trouser bottoms had been pulled up and he was gone.”

“She then managed to scramble back up the grass bank and flag down a motorist who said she was shaking, had suffered serious facial injuries and could hardly speak.”

The court heard that the woman used a key to scratch his face during the attack and she spent a number of weeks in three different hospitals.

The attack was so brutal that Elswaino’s laces and eyelets from his trainers were imprinted on her face.

Judge Michael Pert QC said the blows to the face were ‘like a footballers kick.’

The judge was also shown photos of the victim before and after the attack in which he said it was hard to believe it was the same person.

In mitigation, Michael Auty QC, told the court that Elswaino had had a troubled upbringing and had the reading age of a 10-year-old.

He also added it was important to take into account two factors when sentencing Elswaino - his guilty plea and his age.

“He is 17. But he is functioning at a level below that,” Mr Auty said. It takes a real degree of courage to plead guilty at the first arraignment.”

“There is nothing like this in his past where he has gone out and vented his frustrations.”

“He does not have a mental illness but almost certainly has a personality disorder.”

On sentencing Elswaino, judge Pert said it was a ‘truly horrific’ crime and said that it was ‘premeditated’ and that he believed his version of events to be ‘lies.’

Elswaino was given an indeterminate sentence – meaning he will only be released when he is considered not to be a threat to the general public. He will not be eligible to be considered for parole until at least 2018. He will also be on the sex offenders’ register for life.

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