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Worksop: Major £5 million expansion project is underway at Harley Gallery at Welbeck

Work has begun on the expansion of the Harley Gallery site at Welbeck. Pictured at the site are (from left): Lisa Gee (gallery director), Jason Simms (project manager for Caddick Construction), Robin Brown (tTrustee of the Harley Foundation)

Work has begun on the expansion of the Harley Gallery site at Welbeck. Pictured at the site are (from left): Lisa Gee (gallery director), Jason Simms (project manager for Caddick Construction), Robin Brown (tTrustee of the Harley Foundation)

A ground-breaking ceremony was held this week at The Harley Gallery as Caddick Construction commenced work on the £5 million project to expand the gallery space in Worksop.

Caddick Construction has been awarded the contract, based on previous experience working on bespoke and complex projects.

Hugh Broughton Architects were appointed to design the new Gallery after a tightly fought competition.

The new building will be located alongside The Harley Gallery, which was awarded the first Civic Trust Award for Architecture in Notts in 1995.

The new facility, comprising glazed entrance pavilion and two gallery spaces, will be housed within the walls of the Victorian Tan Gallop, built by the 5th Duke of Portland to train race horses.

Jason Sims, project manager at Caddick Construction, said: “We’re pleased to be working on the extension at Welbeck.”

“The site is steeped in history and within the space the original stone walls will be left exposed to view, whilst the architecture will be simple and restrained.”

The new gallery space will display objects from the historic Portland Collection of fine and decorative arts, built up over the centuries by generations of the Cavendish-Bentinck family.

Lisa Gee, director of The Harley Gallery and Foundation, added: “It’s a really exciting time at the gallery and in Nottsas whole.”

“At a time when we often hear about spending cuts, it is fantastic to be able to develop a new cultural facility for Notts when public subsidy for the arts is diminishing.”

 

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