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Bassetlaw: Poverty and health report paints bleak picture

The Citizen Advice Bureau has relocated to new premises, the former Registry Office at Worksop Town Hall. Bureau director Steve Saddington (centre) and staff members (l-r); Kevin Shaw, Sandra Broome, Helen Baker and Sam Johnston

The Citizen Advice Bureau has relocated to new premises, the former Registry Office at Worksop Town Hall. Bureau director Steve Saddington (centre) and staff members (l-r); Kevin Shaw, Sandra Broome, Helen Baker and Sam Johnston

People living in Bassetlaw are among those most at risk of poverty, a report from the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) has revealed.

The findings show that our district sits in the top 25 per cent of areas with the highest risk of poverty.

Out of 326 local authorities in England, Bassetlaw also ranks highly for its residents being at risk of a whole raft of inequalities including deprivation, child poverty, lower life expectancy and long term unemployment.

The CAB Health and Poverty 2013 report analyses data from the 4,716 clients seen by Bassetlaw CAB last year, alongside government health and employment statistics.

And the advice organisation’s startling conclusions are revealed here:

• The number of people suffering harm to the health through drugs and alcohol is higher than the national average.

• In the most deprived wards in Bassetlaw both men and woman have around seven years lower life expectancy.

• Cancer death rates for people under 75 are higher than the national average.

• And nearly 20 per cent of year six children are obese.

• In Worksop South East ward, which includes Manton, 37.4 per cent of children are living in poverty. In Harworth and Carlton this is 25 per cent.

• People’s incomes in Bassetlaw are less than 60 per cent of the national average.

• An estimated 22 per cent of Bassetlaw households are in fuel poverty.

“Welfare reform, combined with the inadequate one per cent annual cost-of-living increase in benefits to working age people, has caused individuals and families on low incomes to fall further into poverty,” the report says.

“Social housing tenants, single parents, unemployed people, disabled people and members of minority ethnic communities represent a significantly higher proportion of our clients than in the Bassetlaw population as a whole.”

“Most of these groups of people have a low income and a long term health condition.”

However, the report pointed out that poverty was not only a problem suffered by those people on benefits.

“Nearly half of those families in poverty actually have a person in work,” it said.

The report acknowledged that both Bassetlaw Council and Notts Council Council had strategies to try to redress poverty levels.

But it is calling for voluntary, statutory, health and commercial sectors work together to tackle inequalities.

 

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