Wartime buses kept us on move

Government imposed a complete stop of the construction of new public buses, due to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Government imposed a complete stop of the construction of new public buses, due to the outbreak of the Second World War.
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OUR picture last week of the partially demolished F E Jones Newsagents on Potter Street brought back memories for 88-year-old Ivy Barnett who worked there as a teenager.

Ivy, of Netherton Road, Worksop, started work as a shop assistant when she left school at the age of 14 in 1936.

She worked there with the owner Frank Jones for four years before being called up to work on aircraft at Peterborough during the Second World War.

She said: “I used to deliver papers for Mr Jones’ wife Queenie while I was still at school. She had Tompkins newsagents on the market square.”

“Mr Jones had just taken over the shop when I went to work there and he was still there when I came home in 1944 but then eventually he transferred to 25 Potter Street but I don’t know when.”

During the Second World War the Government imposed a complete ban on the construction of new buses to save on materials and because manaufacters were engaged in war work.

The Ministry of War Transport allocated a standard austerity-pattern bus to operators.

This picture shows a Guy Arab type at Abbey Cross bus stop on the number four route from Manton’s Hardwick Road East service through the town centre to Coggan Street, now Gateford Avenue. The fare was 4d.

If you remember these buses please get in touch on 01909 500500.